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28/white/guy/pseudo-tankie Robin Hood Transitional Programme-ite

Background image by klav
I  recently got a review copy of Francis Spufford’s new book Red Plenty,  and, like Brad DeLong, immediately dropped everything to read it. It’s a  fictionalised account, or a non-fiction novel, about the project in the  early 1960s to use computers to plan the Soviet economy. A key figure  is the genius Kantorovich, who invented the mathematical technique of  linear programming in 1938. (We follow his mind as the idea dawns on  him, on a tram.) He and other real characters such as Kosygin and  Khrushchev mingle with fictious characters - some based on real people,  some not, but all convincing.
Includes a link to a very positive review of this novel by Paul  Cockshott, co-author of “Towards a New Socialism” (remember: available as a free PDF), which is well-worth  reading:
"It is clear what lesson orthodox economists will draw:
"It’s a timely exploration, now so many people have gone off  the idea of markets, of why the alternative is worse."
But such conclusions betray an unjustified and callous smugness. It  is a smugness not justified by the elegaic last paragraph of the book.  The restoration of the market mechanism in Russia was a vast controlled  experiment. Nation, national character and culture, natural resources  and productive potential remained the same, only the economic mechanism  changed. If Western economists were right, then we should have expected  economic growth and living standards to have leapt forward after the  Yeltsin shock therapy. Instead the country became an economic  basket-case. Industrial production collapsed, technically advanced  industries atrophied, and living standards fell so much that the death  rate shot up by over a third leading to some 7.7 million extra deaths. If you were old, if you were farmer, if you were a manual worker, the  market was a great deal worse than even the relatively stagnant Soviet  economy of Brezhnev. The recovery under Putin, such as it was, came  almost entirely as a side effect of rising world oil prices, the very  process that had operated under Brezhnev.”
 

I recently got a review copy of Francis Spufford’s new book Red Plenty, and, like Brad DeLong, immediately dropped everything to read it. It’s a fictionalised account, or a non-fiction novel, about the project in the early 1960s to use computers to plan the Soviet economy. A key figure is the genius Kantorovich, who invented the mathematical technique of linear programming in 1938. (We follow his mind as the idea dawns on him, on a tram.) He and other real characters such as Kosygin and Khrushchev mingle with fictious characters - some based on real people, some not, but all convincing.

Includes a link to a very positive review of this novel by Paul Cockshott, co-author of “Towards a New Socialism” (remember: available as a free PDF), which is well-worth reading:

"It is clear what lesson orthodox economists will draw:

"It’s a timely exploration, now so many people have gone off the idea of markets, of why the alternative is worse."

But such conclusions betray an unjustified and callous smugness. It is a smugness not justified by the elegaic last paragraph of the book. The restoration of the market mechanism in Russia was a vast controlled experiment. Nation, national character and culture, natural resources and productive potential remained the same, only the economic mechanism changed. If Western economists were right, then we should have expected economic growth and living standards to have leapt forward after the Yeltsin shock therapy. Instead the country became an economic basket-case. Industrial production collapsed, technically advanced industries atrophied, and living standards fell so much that the death rate shot up by over a third leading to some 7.7 million extra deaths.

If you were old, if you were farmer, if you were a manual worker, the market was a great deal worse than even the relatively stagnant Soviet economy of Brezhnev. The recovery under Putin, such as it was, came almost entirely as a side effect of rising world oil prices, the very process that had operated under Brezhnev.”

 


#socialism #cybernetic economy #ussr
Red Star Over Russia « Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist
 

About a month ago an old friend from my Trotskyist youth sent me the beautiful and inspiring “Red Star Over Russia”, a massive, coffee table type book with text and images geared to the sensibility of my blog readers and Marxmail subscribers. It is a vast collection of photos and images of posters, artwork, etc. from the Russian Revolution until the USSR’s demise.
The author is David King who was the art editor of the Sunday London Times Colour Magazine from 1965 to 1975 and who amassed one of the world’s greatest collections of Russian posters, photographs, and graphics.

Red Star Over Russia « Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist

About a month ago an old friend from my Trotskyist youth sent me the beautiful and inspiring “Red Star Over Russia”, a massive, coffee table type book with text and images geared to the sensibility of my blog readers and Marxmail subscribers. It is a vast collection of photos and images of posters, artwork, etc. from the Russian Revolution until the USSR’s demise.

The author is David King who was the art editor of the Sunday London Times Colour Magazine from 1965 to 1975 and who amassed one of the world’s greatest collections of Russian posters, photographs, and graphics.


#ussr #coffee table book #david king
I’ve loved this take on the traditional icon of St George since I first saw it.  How I would love to have this as a poster.  Even a desktop background would be nice, but I’ve yet to see any high resolution versions of it.  Also, the height-width ratio would call for expanding the field of stars for a desktop picture.
orac:

Trotsky.

I’ve loved this take on the traditional icon of St George since I first saw it.  How I would love to have this as a poster.  Even a desktop background would be nice, but I’ve yet to see any high resolution versions of it.  Also, the height-width ratio would call for expanding the field of stars for a desktop picture.

orac:

Trotsky.


#trotsky #russia #soviet union #ussr #st george #dragon #icon #bolshevik
clubjacobin:

kubanoid:

Death to  the Bourgeoisie and Their Henchmen. Long live the Red Terror!

How could you not reblog?

clubjacobin:

kubanoid:

Death to the Bourgeoisie and Their Henchmen. Long live the Red Terror!

How could you not reblog?


#Soviet #Red Terror #USSR #Communist